Women Really DO Love Bad Boys: Females Are More Likely To Lust After People With Criminal Records Than Males, Study Finds

A new study of the lesser known sexual behaviour of hybristophilia, in which individuals find themselves lusting after those who have committed a criminal act, found it affects more female staff than male, and hardly ever has. Stock image
There has been a long history of people falling for inmates and criminals and now a study has found the phenomenon may be more common than thought. According to a new study of prison guards and other correctional workers, the attraction is felt more by females than males, and hardly ever has a happy ending.

The official term for lusting after people with a criminal record is known as hybristophilia and has been studied by Dr Philippe Bensimon at the University of Montreal.  The behaviour is best demonstrated in cases of infamous serial killers in the US, such as Charles Manson and Ted Bundy who are widely known to have received fan mail of a sexual nature from women.

For those working in correctional facilities in the US, hybristophilia is said to affect almost 4 per cent of prison workers, which includes not only prison guards, but psychologists, social workers, nurses, teachers, and other professionals. Those workers who act on their desires can be punished under US law, with the broad description of sexual misconduct incorporating everything from romantic relationships to obscenity directed at an inmate.

'It's taboo. All penal institutions, without exception, are affected by this phenomenon, but prison administrators try to deny its existence: they don't even talk about it in staff training,' explained Dr Bensimon.
The research found that of more than 300 high profile cases in the US and Europe, women were more affected by the behaviour than men. This skewed proportion may be due to the roles in which women work in prisons, such as doctors or psychologists, which could lead to emotional bonds forming. Stock image
FALLING FOR INMATES

Hybristophilia is a lesser known sexual behaviour in which individuals find themselves lusting after those who have committed criminal acts.

In US correctional facilities, it may affect almost 4 per cent of prison workers, which includes not only prison guards, but psychologists, social workers, nurses, teachers, and other professionals. A study of more than 300 high profile cases in the US and Europe found women were more affected than men.

Researchers explain this skewed proportion may be due to the roles in which women work in prisons, such as doctors or psychologists, which could lead to emotional bonds forming between staff and inmates.

The study finds that in order to tackle the problem, prison administrators should recognise the problem and provide training to staff.

In a study published in the journal Déliquance, justice et autres questions de société, the researcher focused on more than 300 cases of the phenomenon in the US and European media over a ten-year period, from 2005 to 2015.




Share on Google Plus

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Thanks For Visiting My Blog...